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Amazon Rekognition Labels adds 600 new labels, including landmarks, and now detects dominant colors

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Amazon Rekognition offers pre-trained and customizable computer vision capabilities to extract information and insights from images and videos. One such capability is Amazon Rekognition Labels, which detects objects, scenes, actions, and concepts in images. Customers such as Synchronoss, Shutterstock, and Nomad Media use Amazon Rekognition Labels to automatically add metadata to their content library and enable content-based search results. TripleLift uses Amazon Rekognition Labels to determine the best moments to dynamically insert ads that complement the viewing experience for the audience. VidMob uses Amazon Rekognition Labels to extract metadata from ad creatives to understand the unique role of creative decision-making in ad performance, so marketers can produce ads that impact key objectives they care about most. Additionally, thousands of other customers use Amazon Rekognition Labels to support many other use cases, such as classifying trail or hiking photos, detecting people or vehicles in security camera footage, and classifying identity document pictures.

Amazon Rekognition Labels for images detects 600 new labels, including landmarks and activities, and improves accuracy for over 2,000 existing labels. In addition, Amazon Rekognition Labels now supports Image Properties to detect dominant colors of an image, its foreground and background, as well as detected objects with bounding boxes. Image Properties also measures image brightness, sharpness, and contrast. Lastly, Amazon Rekognition Labels now organizes label results using two additional fields, aliases and categories, and supports filtering of those results. In the following sections, we review the new capabilities and their benefits in more detail with some examples.

New labels

Amazon Rekognition Labels has added over 600 new labels, expanding the list of supported labels. The following are some examples of the new labels:

  • Popular landmarks – Brooklyn Bridge, Colosseum, Eiffel Tower, Machu Picchu, Taj Mahal, etc.
  • Activities – Applause, Cycling, Celebrating, Jumping, Walking Dog, etc.
  • Damage detection – Car Dent, Car Scratch, Corrosion, Home Damage, Roof Damage, Termite Damage, etc.
  • Text and documents – Bar Chart, Boarding Pass, Flow Chart, Notebook, Invoice, Receipt, etc.
  • Sports – Baseball Game, Cricket Bat, Figure Skating, Rugby, Water Polo, etc.
  • Many more – Boat Racing, Fun, Cityscape, Village, Wedding Proposal, Banquet, etc.

With these labels, customers in image sharing, stock photography, or broadcast media can automatically add new metadata to their content library to improve their search capabilities.

Let’s look at a label detection example for the Brooklyn Bridge.

The following table shows the labels and confidence scores returned in the API response.

Labels Confidence Scores
Brooklyn Bridge 95.6
Bridge 95.6
Landmark 95.6

Improved labels

Amazon Rekognition Labels has also improved the accuracy for over 2,000 labels. The following are some examples of the improved labels:

  • Activities – Diving, Driving, Reading, Sitting, Standing, etc.
  • Apparel and accessories – Backpack, Belt, Blouse, Hoodie, Jacket, Shoe, etc.
  • Home and indoors – Swimming Pool, Potted Plant, Pillow, Fireplace, Blanket, etc.
  • Technology and computing – Headphones, Mobile Phone, Tablet Computer, Reading, Laptop, etc.
  • Vehicles and automotive – Truck, Wheel, Tire, Bumper, Car Seat, Car Mirror, etc.
  • Text and documents – Passport, Driving License, Business Card, Document, etc.
  • Many more – Dog, Kangaroo, Town Square, Festival, Laughing, etc.

Image Properties for dominant color detection and image quality

Image Properties is a new capability of Amazon Rekognition Labels for images, and can be used with or without the label detection functionality. Note: Image Properties is priced separately from Amazon Rekognition Labels, and is only available with the updated SDKs.

Dominant color detection

Image Properties identifies dominant colors in an image based on pixel percentages. These dominant colors are mapped to the 140 CSS color palette, RGB, hex code, and 12 simplified colors (green, pink, black, red, yellow, cyan, brown, orange, white, purple, blue, grey). By default, the API returns up to 10 dominant colors unless you specify the number of colors to return. The maximum number of dominant colors the API can return is 12.

When used standalone, Image Properties detects the dominant colors of an entire image as well as its foreground and background. When used together with label detection functionalities, Image Properties also identifies the dominant colors of detected objects with bounding boxes.

Customers in image sharing or stock photography can use dominant color detection to enrich their image library metadata to improve content discovery, allowing their end-users to filter by color or search objects with specific colors, such as “blue chair” or “red shoes.” Additionally, customers in advertising can determine ad performance based on the colors of their creative assets.

Image quality

In addition to dominant color detection, Image Properties also measures image qualities through brightness, sharpness, and contrast scores. Each of these scores ranges from 0–100. For example, a very dark image will return low brightness values, whereas a brightly lit image will return high values.

With these scores, customers in image sharing, advertising, or ecommerce can perform quality inspection and filter out images with low brightness and sharpness to reduce false label predictions.

The following image shows an example with the Eiffel Tower.

The following table is an example of Image Properties data returned in the API response.

The following image is an example for a red chair.

The following is an example of Image Properties data returned in the API response.


The following image is an example for a dog with a yellow background.

The following is an example of Image Properties data returned in the API response.


New aliases and categories fields

Amazon Rekognition Labels now returns two new fields, aliases and categories, in the API response. Aliases are other names for the same label and categories group individual labels together based on 40 common themes, such as Food and Beverage and Animals and Pets. With the label detection model update, aliases are no longer returned in the primary list of label names. Instead, aliases are returned in the new aliases field in the API response. Note: Aliases and categories are only returned with the updated SDKs.

Customers in photo sharing, ecommerce, or advertising can use aliases and categories to organize their content metadata taxonomy to further enhance content search and filtering:

  • Aliases example – Because Car and Automobile are aliases, you can add metadata to an image with Car and Automobile at the same time
  • Categories example – You can use categories to create a category filter or display all images related to a particular category, such as Food and Beverage, without having to explicitly add metadata to each image with Food and Beverage

The following image shows a label detection example with aliases and categories for a diver.

The following table shows the labels, confidence scores, aliases, and categories returned in the API response.

Labels Confidence Scores Aliases Categories
Nature 99.9 Nature and Outdoors
Water 99.9 Nature and Outdoors
Scuba Diving 99.9 Aqua Scuba Travel and Adventure
Person 99.9 Human Person Description
Leisure Activities 99.9 Recreation Travel and Adventure
Sport 99.9 Sports Sports

The following image is an example for a cyclist.

The following table contains the labels, confidence scores, aliases, and categories returned in the API response.

Labels Confidence Scores Aliases Categories
Sky 99.9 Nature and Outdoors
Outdoors 99.9 Nature and Outdoors
Person 98.3 Human Person Description
Sunset 98.1 Dusk, Dawn Nature and Outdoors
Bicycle 96.1 Bike Hobbies and Interests
Cycling 85.1 Cyclist, Bike Cyclist Actions

Inclusion and exclusion filters

Amazon Rekognition Labels introduces new inclusion and exclusion filtering options in the API input parameters to narrow down the specific list of labels returned in the API response. You can provide an explicit list of labels or categories that you want to include or exclude. Note: These filters are available with the updated SDKs.

Customers can use inclusion and exclusion filters to obtain specific labels or categories they are interested in without having to create additional logic in their application. For example, customers in insurance can use LabelCategoriesInclusionFilter to only include label results in the Damage Detection category.

The following code is an API sample request with inclusion and exclusion filters:

{ "Image": { "S3Object": { "Bucket": "bucket", "Name": "input.jpg" } }, "MaxLabels": 10, "MinConfidence": 75, "Features": [ "GENERAL_LABELS", "IMAGE_PROPERTIES" ], "Settings": { "GeneralLabels": { "LabelsInclusionFilter": [<Label(s)>],  "LabelsExclusionFilter": [<Label(s)>], "LabelCategoriesInclusionFilter": [<Category Name(s)>], "LabelCategoriesExclusionFilter": [<Category Name(s)>] }, "ImageProperties": { "MaxDominantColors":10 } } }

The following are examples of how inclusion and exclusion filters work:

  • If you only want to detect Person and Car, and don’t care about other labels, you can specify [“Person”,”Car”] in LabelsInclusionFilter.
  • If you want to detect all labels except for Clothing, you can specify [“Clothing”] in LabelsExclusionFilter.
  • If you want to detect only labels within the Animal and Pets categories except for Dog and Cat, you can specify ["Animal and Pets"] in the LabelCategoriesInclusionFilter, with ["Dog", "Cat"] in LabelsExclusionFilter.
  • If a label is specified in LabelsInclusionFilter or LabelsExclusionFilter, their aliases will be included or excluded accordingly because aliases is a sub-taxonomy of labels. For example, because Automobile is an alias of Car, if you specify Car in LabelsInclusionFilter, the API will return the Car label with Automobile in the aliases field.

Conclusion

Amazon Rekognition Labels detects 600 new labels and improves accuracy for over 2,000 existing labels. Along with these updates, Amazon Rekognition Labels now supports Image Properties, aliases and categories, as well as inclusion and inclusion filters.

To try the new label detection model with its new features, log in to your AWS account and check out the Amazon Rekognition console for label detection and image properties. To learn more, visit Detecting labels.


About the authors

Maria Handoko is a Senior Product Manager at AWS. She focuses on helping customers solve their business challenges through machine learning and computer vision. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, listening to podcasts, and exploring different cuisines.

Shipra Kanoria is a Principal Product Manager at AWS. She is passionate about helping customers solve their most complex problems with the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence. Before joining AWS, Shipra spent over 4 years at Amazon Alexa, where she launched many productivity-related features on the Alexa voice assistant.

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